Yonatan Levi is an attorney living in Englewood, N.J., and a weekly humor columnist for the Jewish Link of New Jersey. Send any comments, questions or insults to columnists@cjn.org.

Latest Column

Many Jews enjoy eating different forms of cream. They often eat cream cheese (especially with bagels), sour cream (especially with borscht) and, of course, the ubiquitous, crowd-pleasing ice cream (especially for dessert at a bar/bar mitzvah). But even though many Jews love a frozen treat, i…

Recent Headlines

At Jewish celebrations, the hora is danced in a series of concentric circles, with the guests of honor typically in the center. As the circles spin round and round, guests in the outer circles angle and compete for the coveted center status.

Many Jews light candles, but not all use a pricket. Many Jews drink wine, but not all use a flasket. And many Jews enjoy eating meat, but not all eat a brisket. That said, a large percentage of carnivorous Jews delight in devouring brisket, whether served on a plate, in a sandwich or simply …

It is fair to say that anyone who sends a timely and sincere thank-you card after receiving a gift, clearly has menschy manners. Such authoring of appreciation is a classy gesture oozing with etiquette and pulsating with politeness. When you put in writing that a gift is gratifying, you show…

If an alien from outer space were to land on Earth, it might be difficult to explain to such a newcomer the current composition of the Jewish people.  Technically speaking, a Jew is a Jew is a Jew. Practically speaking, however, many Jews put themselves or others into different groups with s…

In the average synagogue, there are only a few instances during Shabbat morning services in which most or all congregants stop chatting. It usually happens during the Musaf repetition, rabbi’s sermon and weekly announcements. It also happens during the Mourner’s Kaddish.

Few jobs are more demanding than that of the pulpit rabbi. It essentially requires being at the congregation’s beck and call all year-long, 24 hours a day. If pulpit rabbis were allowed to bill by the hour, then there likely would be a marked increase in applications to rabbinical school.

Passover is a relatively intense holiday in that it requires a drastic change in daily diet. We spend a week assiduously avoiding chametz and conspicuously limiting ourselves to matzah and anything else that is “kosher for Passover.” When Passover ends, however, we revert to our old leavened…