About Silver Linings

“Silver Linings,” a feature about life after retirement. If you are a retiree with an interesting story about your new life or know of someone who fits the bill, email your suggestion to editorial@cjn.org and include “Silver Linings” in the subject line or tweet us at @CleveJN.

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When diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2007, Karen Jaffe found there weren’t many options available to seek help and support while she grappled with her life-changing diagnosis.

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When Linda McMullen’s brother died in 2009, it set off a chain of unfortunate events in her life. Her husband passed a month later, and then one of her cats died in 2010. By July 2010, she was downsized out of a career she had been in for over 35 years.

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After the death of his mother when he was 3 years old, South Euclid resident Herb Resnick’s father brought him everywhere with him – even to volunteer activities. Getting exposed to these experiences early set the course of his life – both civically and professionally.

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While working as a teacher, Steve Goodman was helping his community by educating generations of children at The Lillian and Betty Ratner School. Once he retired, finding he had a lot of extra time, Goodman decided to help in the community in a new way – through volunteering.

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Following a long career in health care, Gail Sands was determined to find another way to help her community while in retirement. She turned to volunteerism – something she had done since childhood but now had more time for.

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Long before Elizabeth (Lee) Warshawsky retired, she was a volunteer through and through. Out in her community while still punching the clock, it only made sense for her to continue that endeavor into her retirement.

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When Hazel Brown retired in 2012 from her career as a human resources manager, she already had the people-centric skills that you would need when volunteering.