On Jan. 27, 120 survivors of the Auschwitz concentration camp will return to the site in Poland to commemorate the 75th anniversary of its liberation. They will travel across the globe with their caregivers, wheelchairs and walkers in the still of winter and they will take a difficult dive i…

It may have been the snacks; it could have been the hour (midnight) or that we were all scrambling onto our buses and answering ‘here’ when our names were called, which made it feel for all the world like a youth group outing. For all kinds of reasons, the at-mosphere was almost too… happy, …

The Jewish story is one of both slavery and redemption. Every year, we recount the Exodus, the journey of our ancestors from bondage to freedom. This retelling forms the core of Jewish empathy for the most vulnerable, and our moral imperative to uphold the right of every individual to be free. 

As I watched on television young people in Charlottesville, Va., –  many in their 20s and 30s –chanting things like, “Jews will not replace us,” I was reminded of some of the most powerful stories my father, Dick DeWine, told me about what he witnessed as a soldier during World War II. Dad d…

Jews are asking if we’re back in the 1920s. But to columnist Abraham H. Miller, the scene outside a Charlottesville synagogue is more like Odessa in 1905. In Charlottesville, as three white supremacists with semi-automatic weapons stood across from the synagogue, the congregants left through the back door. During the Odessa pogrom of 1905, Jews created armed militias and fought back. Jews need to learn from their own tragic history and from other ethnic groups that acted to defend themselves. Walking out the back door of a synagogue should never be the recommended option, writes Miller.

Back in April, when I first introduced you to CJN Tomorrow, an initiative intended to grow the voice of up-and-coming leaders in Northeast Ohio, it was merely a concept we hoped would take off. 

The visits, the food, the cards and the donations we received in memory of my husband, Rabbi Michael Hecht, are signs and symbols of our community, of what we mean to each other, the bonds we share in life and death, and how those bonds sustain us in difficult times.

Years before the concept of “tikun olam,” repairing the world, became for some a kind of watchword for applied Judaism, there was a proud Jew born and raised in Cleveland named Eliezer Jaffe. For him, repairing what was wrong and unjust in Israeli society was a driving force in his life. Las…

It’s not often I take to these pages in an open letter to our readers. In the past when I’ve done so it’s been to share with you our growth strategies, enhancements to our products, or to remind you of our editorial priorities.

My mom passed away almost three years ago. It was not a tragic death as she was just a few weeks shy of her 92nd birthday, and she had been steadily declining, in mind and body, for several years. I am surprised to find, however, that as time passes, I think of her more, not less, and I find…